Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Independent and Visible

Independent and not ever the same.
Independence: How people with disabilities live every day.
Independence: Respecting Others
Indepencence: Free of judgement.
Oct 20 '14
jillypeppa:

creepin @kircherabdul. 👀

jillypeppa:

creepin @kircherabdul. 👀

Oct 20 '14
rikkipoynter:

"But you don’t look deaf!"
I had to re-film the video.I still kept the post-it.

rikkipoynter:

"But you don’t look deaf!"

I had to re-film the video.
I still kept the post-it.

Oct 20 '14

everconstant:

All of the above paintings were painted by a THREE YEAR OLD!

She has autism and is being called the “Mini Monet”

—Iris Grace Halmshaw’s colorful, impressionistic watercolor paintings have an ethereal, glowing, floral beauty, prompting comparison to Monet. Halmshaw, who lives in Market Harborough, England, is 3 years old, autistic and does not speak. Her parents first handed her a paintbrush hoping to help her connect with others; their hopes were more than realized. “When she started doing art therapy we thought it was amazing, but we’re her parents so we think everything she does is amazing,” her dad, Peter-Jon Halmshaw, said. Others thought so, too – and now Iris Grace’s paintings are selling for almost $1,300. Her first painting was sold at a charity auction. Profits from other sales of her paintings go toward her art supplies and therapy.

Check out this amazing little girl’s art:

  http://irisgracepainting.com/

 —- This needs a bajillion notes

Oct 20 '14

harlequinnade:

Mat Fraser is a gift (x)

Oct 20 '14
Oct 20 '14
"All disabled people experience disability as social restriction, whether those restrictions occur as a consequence of inaccessible built environments, questionable notions of intelligence and social competence, the inability of the general population to use sign language, the lack of reading material in Braille, or hostile public attitudes to people with non-visible disabilities."
Oliver (via spookyspoonie)
Oct 20 '14
justrollinon:

thefaeyourmumwarnedyouabout:

Work antics… My coworker found this sticker haha!

as a person with Spina Bifida, I completely approve. That’s hilarious and I want it

justrollinon:

thefaeyourmumwarnedyouabout:

Work antics… My coworker found this sticker haha!

as a person with Spina Bifida, I completely approve. That’s hilarious and I want it

Oct 20 '14

theperksofbeingdisabled:

I was thinking I’m afraid of riding a bike (most because I know I’ll probably fall down) and this guy came through my mind. He’s so nuts it’s badass.

Oct 20 '14
loveacceptautistics:

For the month of October, PACLA will be sharing information to help make Halloween safe & accessible for everyone! Autistic children deserve a #posAutive experience in an often overwhelming time of  year. We ALL do. Look for the hashtag #AccessibleHalloween, contribute your own ideas and accommodations, and share widely! The more people we reach, the more inclusive we can make this holiday. Thanks and may we all have a HAPPY and #AccessibleHalloween!  Image Description: Orange textured background, with a large hashtag at the top, #accessiblehalloween, and a large number 1. A black banner stretches across the meme, with white text reading:  Strobe light might seem fun to create a “scary” atmosphere, but they are not safe for those with epilepsy or sensory sensitivities to lights. Strobe lights can trigger seizures and migraines. Lanterns and soft, glowing lights are a safe alternative that will let ALL know they are welcome. facebook.com/ParentingAutisticChildrenWithLoveAcceptance

loveacceptautistics:

For the month of October, PACLA will be sharing information to help make Halloween safe & accessible for everyone! Autistic children deserve a #posAutive experience in an often overwhelming time of
year. We ALL do. Look for the hashtag #AccessibleHalloween, contribute your own ideas and accommodations, and share widely! The more people we reach, the more inclusive we can make this holiday. Thanks and may we all have a HAPPY and #AccessibleHalloween!

Image Description: Orange textured background, with a large hashtag at the top, #accessiblehalloween, and a large number 1. A black banner stretches across the meme, with white text reading:

Strobe light might seem fun to create a “scary” atmosphere, but they are not safe for those with epilepsy or sensory sensitivities to lights. Strobe lights can trigger seizures and migraines. Lanterns and soft, glowing lights are a safe alternative that will let ALL know they are welcome.

facebook.com/ParentingAutisticChildrenWithLoveAcceptance

Oct 20 '14